Divine Domesticities

Divine Domesticities

Christian Paradoxes in Asia and the Pacific

Divine DomesticitiesEdited by: Hyaeweol Choi orcid, Margaret Jolly orcid

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Description

Divine Domesticities: Christian Paradoxes in Asia and the Pacific fills a huge lacuna in the scholarly literature on missionaries in Asia/Pacific and is transnational history at its finest. Co-edited by two eminent scholars, this multidisciplinary volume, an outgrowth of several conferences/seminars, critically examines various encounters between western missionaries and indigenous women in the Pacific/Asia … Taken as a whole, this is a thought-provoking and an indispensable reference, not only for students of colonialism/imperialism but also for those of us who have an interest in transnational and gender history in general. The chapters are very clearly written, engaging, and remarkably accessible; the stories are compelling and the research is thorough. The illustrations are equally riveting and the bibliography is extremely useful.
—Theodore Jun Yoo, History Department, University of Hawai’i

The editors of this collection of papers have done an excellent job of creating a coherent set of case studies that address the diverse impacts of missionaries and Christianity on ‘domesticity’, and therefore on the women and children who were assumed to be the rightful inhabitants of that sphere … The introduction to the volume is beautifully written and sets up the rest of the volume in a comprehensive way. It explains the book’s aim to advance theoretical and methodological issues by exploring the role of missionary encounters in the development of modern domesticities; showing the agency of indigenous women in negotiating both change and continuity; and providing a wide range of case studies to show ‘breadth and complexity’ and the local and national specificities of engagements with both missionaries and modernity. My view is that all three aims are well and truly fulfilled.
—Helen Lee, Head, Sociology and Anthropology, La Trobe University, Melbourne

Details

ISBN (print):
9781925021943
ISBN (online):
9781925021950
Publication date:
Oct 2014
Imprint:
ANU Press
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.22459/DD.10.2014
Disciplines:
Arts & Humanities: Cultural Studies, History, Philosophy & Religion; Social Sciences: Gender Studies, Indigenous Studies, Sociology
Countries:
East Asia, Pacific, South Asia, Southeast Asia

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Divine Domesticities »

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Part One — Permeability and Paradox: Revisiting Domestic and Public in Asia and the Pacific

  1. The Missionary Home as a Pulpit: Domestic Paradoxes in Early Twentieth-Century Korea (PDF, 3.5MB) – Hyaeweol Choi doi
  2. Missionaries and “A Better Baby Movement” in Colonial Korea (PDF, 276KB) – Sonja M. Kim doi
  3. All Other Loves Excelling: Mary Kidder, Wakamatsu Shizuko and Modern Marriage in Meiji Japan (PDF, 2.8MB) – Rebecca Copeland doi
  4. Raising the Standards of Family Life: Ginling Women’s College and Christian Social Service in Republican China (PDF, 252KB) – Helen M. Schneider doi

Part Two — Sacred and Secular Genealogies: Christian Missions and States—Colonial and Contemporary

  1. Sacred Genealogies of Development: Christianity and the Indian Modern (PDF, 194KB) – Kalpana Ram doi
  2. “Ol Meri Bilong Wok” (Hard-working Women): Women, Work and Domesticity in Papua New Guinea (PDF, 1.5MB) – Jemima Mowbray doi
  3. “Tired for nothing”? Women, Chiefs, and the Domestication of Customary Authority in Solomon Islands (PDF, 3.3MB) – Debra McDougall doi

Part Three — The Architectonics of Home and Emotion: New Christian Families in Conversion Experiences

  1. Agency and Salvation in Christian Child Rescue in Colonial India: Preena and Amy Carmichael (PDF, 15.2MB) – Annie McCarthy doi
  2. Deviant Domesticities and Sexualised Childhoods: Prostitutes, Eunuchs and the Limits of the State Child “Rescue” Mission in Colonial India (PDF, 202KB) – Jessica Hinchy doi
  3. A New Family: Domesticity and Sentiment among Chinese and Western Women at Shanghai’s Door of Hope (PDF, 138KB) – Sue Gronewold doi
  4. From Open Fale to Mission Houses: Negotiating the Boundaries of “Domesticity” in Samoa (PDF, 1.8MB) – Latu Latai doi
  5. Paradoxical Intimacies: The Christian Creation of the Huli Domestic Sphere (PDF, 150KB) – Holly Wardlow doi

Part Four — On and Beneath the Skin: Embodiment and Sensuous Agency

  1. Paradoxical Performances: Cruel Constraints and Christian Emancipation in 19–20th-Century Missionary Representations of Chinese Women and Girls (PDF, 144KB) – Shih-Wen Sue Chen doi
  2. Bibles, Baseball and Butterfly Sleeves: Filipina Women and American Protestant Missions, 1900–1930 (PDF, 751KB) – Laura R. Prieto doi
  3. The Materiality of Missionisation in Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea (PDF, 2.4MB) – Anna-Karina Hermkens doi
  4. A Saturated History of Christianity and Cloth in Oceania (PDF, 4.4MB) – Margaret Jolly doi

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