Gabriele Bammer

Gabriele Bammer is a professor at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health at The Australian National University and a research fellow at the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her main interest is effective ways of bringing different disciplinary and practice perspectives together to tackle major social issues, including knowledge brokering to bridge the research-policy/ practice gap. She is seeking to develop more formal processes for doing this by establishing a new specialisation – Integration and Implementation Sciences. In 2001 she was the Australian representative on the inaugural Fulbright New Century Scholars Program, which targets ‘outstanding research scholars and professionals’. She has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications.

orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9098-0951

Change! »

Combining Analytic Approaches with Street Wisdom

Edited by: Gabriele Bammer
Change happens all the time, so why is driving particular change generally so hard? Why are the outcomes often unpredictable? Are some types of change easier to achieve than others? Are some techniques for achieving change more effective than others? How can change that is already in train be stopped or deflected? Knowledge about change is fragmented and there is nowhere in the academic or practice worlds that provides comprehensive answers to these and other questions. Every discipline and practice area has only a partial view and there is not even a map of those different perspectives. The purpose of this book is to begin the task of developing a comprehensive approach to change by gathering a variety of viewpoints from the academic and practice worlds.

Disciplining Interdisciplinarity »

Integration and Implementation Sciences for Researching Complex Real-World Problems

Authored by: Gabriele Bammer
This book provides collaborative research teams with a systematic approach for addressing complex real-world problems like widespread poverty, global climate change, organised crime, and escalating health care costs. The three core domains are Synthesising disciplinary and stakeholder knowledge, Understanding and managing diverse unknowns, and Providing integrated research support for policy and practice change. Each of these three domains is organised around five questions For what and for whom? Which knowledge, unknowns and aspects of policy or practice? How? Context? Outcome? This simple framework lays the foundations for developing compilations of concepts, methods and case studies about applying systems thinking, scoping and boundary setting, framing, dealing with values, harnessing and managing differences, undertaking dialogue, building models, applying common metrics, accepting unknowns, advocacy, end-user engagement, understanding authorisation, dealing with organisational facilitators and barriers, and much more. The book makes a case for a new research style—integrative applied research—and a new discipline of Integration and Implementation Sciences or I2S. It advocates for progressing these through an I2S Development Drive. It builds on theory and practice-based research in multi-, inter- and transdisciplinarity, post-normal science, systemic intervention, integrated assessment, sustainability science, team science, mode 2, action research and other approaches. The book concludes with 24 commentaries by Simon Bronitt; L. David Brown; Marcel Bursztyn and Maria Beatriz Maury; Lawrence Cram; Ian Elsum; Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski; Fasihuddin; Howard Gadlin and L. Michelle Bennett; Budi Haryanto; Julie Thompson Klein; Ted Lefroy; Catherine Lyall; M. Duane Nellis; Linda Neuhauser; Deborah O’Connell with Damien Farine, Michael O’Connor and Michael Dunlop; Michael O’Rourke; Christian Pohl; Merritt Polk; Alison Ritter; Alice Roughley; Michael Smithson; Daniel Walker; Michael Wesley; and Glenn Withers. These begin a process of appraisal, discussion and debate across diverse networks.

Bridging the "Know–Do" Gap »

Knowledge brokering to improve child wellbeing

Today’s children are tomorrow’s citizens. Good health and well-being in the early years are the foundations for well-adjusted and productive adult lives and a thriving society. But children are being let down in Australia and elsewhere by the lack of knowledge transfer between the worlds of research, policy and practice. Improving such transfer is the job of knowledge brokers – the various ways they can operate are explored in this book through case examples and the lessons learned from experienced proponents. The book concludes by posing three sets of ideas to shape the future of knowledge brokering.

Dealing with Uncertainties in Policing Serious Crime »

Edited by: Gabriele Bammer
Grappling with uncertainties is at the heart of investigating serious crime. At a time when such crime is becoming more complex and resources are increasingly stretched, this book draws together research and practice perspectives to review fruitful approaches to uncertainties and to chart the way forward. Scene setting chapters describe the consequences of globalisation and the spread of sophisticated information technologies (Sue Wilkinson), as well as advances in understanding and managing uncertainty (Michael Smithson). Ways of enhancing responses from statistics (Robyn Attewell), risk analysis (Richard Jarrett and Mark Westcott) and the psychology of decision making (Mark Kebbell, Damon Muller and Kirsty Martin) follow. These are complemented by insights from law (the Hon. Tim Carmody SC), politics (the Hon. Carmen Lawrence) and business (Neil Fargher), which all have significant intersections with policing. Synthesis is provided by the four final chapters which present the outlooks of the investigating officer and investigation manager (Peter Martin), the provider of policing higher education (Tracey Green and Greg Linsdell), the capacity-building consultant (Steve Longford), and the leader of a law enforcement agency (Alastair Milroy).

Research Integration Using Dialogue Methods »

Authored by: David McDonald, Gabriele Bammer, Peter Deane
Research on real-world problems—like restoration of wetlands, the needs of the elderly, effective disaster response and the future of the airline industry—requires expert knowledge from a range of disciplines, as well as from stakeholders affected by the problem and those in a position to do something about it. This book charts new territory in taking a systematic approach to research integration using dialogue methods to bring together multiple perspectives. It links specific dialogue methods to particular research integration tasks. Fourteen dialogue methods for research integration are classified into two groups: Dialogue methods for understanding a problem broadly: integrating judgements Dialogue methods for understanding particular aspects of a problem: integrating visions, world views, interests and values. The methods are illustrated by case studies from four research areas: the environment, public health, security and technological innovation.