Health Expenditure, Income and Health Status Among Indigenous and Other Australians

Health Expenditure, Income and Health Status Among Indigenous and Other Australians

Authored by: Matthew Gray, Boyd Hunter, John Taylor

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Description

Using data from the 1995 National Health Survey (NHS) this study asks the question—what is the relationship between income, health expenditure and health status for the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in Australia? Income is generally seen as an indicator of ability to address the need for health expenditure, and as a factor in influencing health status. The expectation, therefore, is that income and health status are positively related.

The analysis measures differences in health expenditure and reported health status between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, holding income level constant. No association is found between income and Indigenous health status. A number of explanations are canvassed. The finding may simply reflect poor data quality, both in terms of income and self-assessed health status. An alternative hypothesis, with long-term implications, is that adult mortality reflects foetal and childhood health, regardless of current income status.

Details

ISBN (print):
9781920942151
ISBN (online):
9781920942144
Publication date:
Aug 2004
Note:
CAEPR Monograph No. 21
Imprint:
ANU Press
DOI:
http://doi.org/10.22459/CAEPR21.08.2004
Series:
Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)
Co-publisher:
Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)
Disciplines:
Social Sciences: Indigenous Studies, Social Policy & Administration, Statistics & Operational Research
Countries:
Australia