David Bulbeck

David Bulbeck is a specialist in the archaeology and palaeoanthropology of Peninsular Malaysia and Sulawesi. Bulbeck’s PhD, from ANU, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Social Sciences (CASS), included a survey of fortifications and other sites associated with the rise of Makassar as a trading emporium in South Sulawesi between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries AD. A subsequent project focused on the historical archaeology of the early iron-producing kingdom of Luwuq, South Sulawesi. Since 2009, Bulbeck has been a Research Associate in the ANU Department of Archaeology and Natural History, devoting most of his time to a project on the prehistory of the Lake Towuti region in south-eastern Sulawesi.

orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9733-6509

The Archaeology of Sulawesi »

Current Research on the Pleistocene to the Historic Period

The central Indonesian island of Sulawesi has recently been hitting headlines with respect to its archaeology. It contains some of the oldest directly dated rock art in the world, and some of the oldest evidence for a hominin presence beyond the southeastern limits of the Ice Age Asian continent. In this volume, scholars from Indonesia and Australia come together to present their research findings and views on a broad range of topics. From early periods, these include observations on Ice Age climate, life in caves and open sites, rock art, and the animals that humans exploited and lived alongside. The archaeology presented from later periods covers the rise of the Bugis kingdom, Chinese trade ceramics, and a range of site-based and regional topics from the Neolithic through to the arrival of Islam. This carefully edited volume is the first to be devoted entirely to the archaeology of the island of Sulawesi, and it lays down a baseline for significant future research. Peter Bellwood Emeritus Professor The Australian National University

New Perspectives in Southeast Asian and Pacific Prehistory »

‘This volume brings together a diversity of international scholars, unified in the theme of expanding scientific knowledge about humanity’s past in the Asia-Pacific region. The contents in total encompass a deep time range, concerning the origins and dispersals of anatomically modern humans, the lifestyles of Pleistocene and early Holocene Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers, the emergence of Neolithic farming communities, and the development of Iron Age societies. These core enduring issues continue to be explored throughout the vast region covered here, accordingly with a richness of results as shown by the authors. Befitting of the grand scope of this volume, the individual contributions articulate perspectives from multiple study areas and lines of evidence. Many of the chapters showcase new primary field data from archaeological sites in Southeast Asia. Equally important, other chapters provide updated regional summaries of research in archaeology, linguistics, and human biology from East Asia through to the Western Pacific.’ Mike T. Carson Associate Professor of Archaeology Micronesian Area Research Center University of Guam