International Review of Environmental History

International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It publishes on all thematic and geographical topics of environmental history, but especially encourages articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘Global South’. This includes but is not limited to Australasia, East and South East Asia, Africa and South America.

International Review of Environmental History’s editorial board includes historians, scientists and geographers, as well as scholars from other backgrounds, who work on environmental history and related disciplines, such as ecology, garden history and landscape studies. The methodological breadth of International Review of Environmental History distinguishes it from other environmental history journals, as does its attempt to draw together cognate research areas in garden history and landscape studies.

The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. We encourage scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations and timescales. We embrace interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes.

International Review of Environmental History is happy to consider future special issues focusing on themes drawn from conferences or collaborations.

Ownership and management

The Centre for Science in Society at Victoria University of Wellington provides funding to the journal for an editorial assistant. The Centre for Environmental History at The Australian National University sponsors the journal, and ANU Press publishes a free electronic version and a print-on-demand hard copy of the journal. It is also supported by the Environmental Research Institute of the University of Waikato, New Zealand: www.waikato.ac.nz/eri. Our open-access policy means that articles will be available free to scholars around the world, ensuring high citation rates and impact in and beyond the field of history.

Publishing schedule

International Review of Environmental History is published twice a year, in April and November. Special issues may also be published either within or outside the normal publication schedule of the journal.

Access

Fully open-access electronic publication with a print-on-demand paperback copy option.

Copyright and licensing

All issues published from Volume 4(1) onwards are published under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). Issues published previous to this are under a standard copyright licence. Authors retain copyright of articles published in this journal.

Revenue sources

From 2017 to 2019, International Review of Environmental History is receiving funding from Centre for Science in Society at Victoria University of Wellington for an editorial assistant (Dr Austin Gee) to prepare two annual issues.

Author fees

There are no fees charged to authors for publishing work in the International Review of Environmental History. Authors are, however, expected to pay where required any fees arising from using copyright works within their articles.

Peer review process

All articles submitted to this journal undergo a double-blind peer-review process. The peer-review process is arranged by the Journal Editor, who then decides upon publication, amendment or rejection. Manuscripts that undergo amendment may be subject to further review by the Journal Editor or an external reviewer.

Process for identification of and dealing with allegations of research misconduct

If the Journal Editor receives a credible allegation of misconduct by an author, reviewer, or editor, then they have a duty to investigate the matter with ANU Press, in consultation with relevant Associate Editors and members of the Editorial Board. If the claim is substantiated, the Editor will follow the guidelines set out by COPE for retracting the article in question.

If the Journal Editor receives convincing evidence that the main substance or conclusions of an article published in the journal are incorrect, then, in consultation with the journal’s Associate Editors and/or Editorial Board and ANU Press, the Journal Editor will ensure the publication of an appropriate notice of correction.

Publication ethics

International Review of Environmental History (IREH) follows the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and its Best Practice Guidelines. Authors, editors and reviewers should familiarise themselves with these guidelines.

Duties/responsibilities of authors

Authors are responsible for providing:

  • original submissions of articles, fully referenced according to the journal’s guidelines, which follow Chicago style with Australian spelling. For more details on Chicago style, please see: www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html (incorrect referencing will mean that articles may not be considered for publication)
  • payment for all costs and copyright permissions of all images
  • filling out journal copyright and author’s declaration forms, which will be provided to authors once an article is accepted for publication
  • acknowledgement of any material that has been previously published
  • acknowledging any external research grants/conflicts of interest.

Duties/responsibilities of editors

  • The Editor of International Review of Environmental History may reject a submitted manuscript without formal peer review if he/she considers it to be inappropriate for the journal and outside its scope.
  • The Editor reserves the right to have final decisions on the content of all journal issues.
  • The Editor keeps the peer-review process confidential.
  • The Editor will make all reasonable effort to process submissions on time.
  • The Editor will delegate the peer review of any original self-authored research article to a member of the editorial or advisory board as appropriate.

Duties/responsibilities of reviewers

Reviewers are responsible for ensuring:

  • timely production of reviews
  • fair and unbiased assessment
  • they follow the guidelines for review document of the journal, which will be provided to the reviewer once they accept the position.

In addition, reviewers will keep in mind the following guidelines for the review: https://publicationethics.org/files/Ethical_Guidelines_For_Peer_Reviewers_2.pdf

Submission

Author(s) submitting an original manuscript to IREH must present unpublished work that is not under consideration elsewhere. Plagiarism, including duplicate publication of the author's own work, in whole or in part without proper citation is not accepted by the journal. IREH may check manuscripts submitted to the journal for originality using anti-plagiarism software.

  • Authors must be aware of, and comply with, best practice in publication ethics including, but not limited to, plagiarism, manipulation of figures, declaration of competing interests and compliance with policies on research ethics.
  • Reviewers and editors are required to treat manuscripts fairly and in confidence, and to declare any competing interests.

Plagiarism

International Review of Environmental History (IREH) will not accept plagiarised articles. Plagiarism is ‘the process or practice of using another person's ideas or work and pretending that it is your own’ (Cambridge Dictionary).

Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to:

  • Copying or downloading figures, photographs, pictures or diagrams without acknowledgement of sources.
  • Directly copying text from other sources without attribution, including text downloaded from the internet.
  • Using an idea from another source with slightly modified language without attribution.
  • Copying ideas, images or data from other sources without acknowledging the source.
  • Reusing text from your own previous publications without attribution or agreement of the editor.

Misconduct

In situations of alleged misconduct, IREH will follow COPE guidance. In cases of misconduct, if necessary, we will correct or clarify the record. This may include retraction, issuing a correction or expression of concern, as per COPE guidelines.

Additional resources on publication ethics are available from COPE and WAME.

Acknowledgements

Please note, this is drawn up from COPE guidelines, and from https://journals.plos.org/plosone/s/ethical-publishing-practice. IREH thanks the advice of Richard White, Manager, Copyright & Open Access, University of Otago/ Te Whare Wananga o Otago.

Editorial team

Editor: James Beattie, The Centre for Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand; Research Associate, the Centre for Environmental History, The Australian National University, Australia; Senior Research Associate, Department of History, Faculty of Humanities, University of Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa; Senior Research Associate, World Centre for Environmental History, Sussex University, United Kingdom

Associate Editors:

  • Brett M. Bennett, University of Western Sydney, Australia; University of Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa
  • Andrea Gaynor, University of Western Australia, Australia
  • Ruth Morgan, Australian National University, Australia

Copyeditor: Austin Gee

Contact: james.beattie@vuw.ac.nz

Board members

  • Courtney Addison, Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand
  • Eugene N. Anderson, University of California, Riverside, United States of America
  • Alessandro Antonello, Flinders University, Australia
  • Maohong Bao包茂宏, Peking University, People’s Republic of China
  • Greg Barton, University of Western Sydney, Australia
  • David Biggs, University of California, Riverside, United States of America
  • Tom Brooking, University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand
  • Nicholas Brown, The Australian National University, Australia
  • Matthew Chew, Arizona State University, United States of America
  • Bruce Clarkson, University of Waikato
  • Christopher J. Courtney, Durham University
  • Rosi Crane, Otago Museum
  • Gregory T. Cushman, University of Kansas
  • Vinita Damodaran, University of Sussex
  • Rohan D'Souza, Kyoto University
  • Ian Duggan, University of Waikato
  • Sonja Dumpelmann, Harvard University
  • Fa-ti Fan, Binghamton University
  • James R. Fleming, Colby College
  • Guorong Gao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
  • Andrea Gaynor, University of Western Australia
  • Tom Griffiths, The Australian National University
  • Eugenia Herbert, Mount Holyoke College
  • Katie Holmes, La Trobe University
  • Adrian Howkins, Colorado State University
  • Tom Isern, North Dakota State University
  • Nancy Jacobs, Brown University
  • Ryan Tucker Jones, Oregon State University
  • Peter Lavelle, Temple University
  • Joseph Lawson, Newcastle University
  • Robert B. Marks, Whittier College
  • Edward Melillo, Amherst College
  • Simone Muller, Rachel Carson Center, Ludwigs Maximilian University, Munich
  • Grace Moore, University of Otago
  • Emily O'Gorman, Macquarie University
  • Hiroki Oikawa及川敬貴, Yokohama National University
  • José Pádua, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
  • Eric Pawson, University of Canterbury
  • Ulrike Plath, Tallinn University
  • Simon Pooley, Imperial College London
  • Rebecca Rice, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • Libby Robin, The Australian National University
  • Kirstie Ross, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery
  • Cordula Scherer, Trinity College Dublin
  • Fei Sheng费晟, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Lance van Sittert, University of Cape Town
  • Paul Star, University of Waikato
  • Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University
  • Fiona Williamson, Singapore Management University

 

Please send article submissions or abstracts to the Editor, Associate Professor James Beattie, Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6142, New Zealand. Email: james.beattie@vuw.ac.nz

Abstracts should be no more than 200 words, and include a list of keywords. Articles should be in the range 5,000 to 8,000 words (including footnotes), although longer submissions may be considered after consultation with the Editor.

Style and referencing: please use footnotes in Chicago style, and follow Australian spelling. For more details on Chicago style, please see: www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

The journal also accepts letters and short ‘think pieces’. Please contact the Editor for further information.


International Review of Environmental History: Volume 7, Issue 1, 2021 »

Edited by: James Beattie, Ruth Morgan, Margaret Cook
Publication date: June 2021
Arising from the ‘Placing Gender’ workshop held in Melbourne in 2018, this collection brings together contributions that demonstrate different approaches to undertaking gender analysis in environmental history. Focusing on non-Indigenous women and men in the Anglo-world from the mid-nineteenth century, some adopt new tools to excavate familiar terrain, while others listen closely to voices that have rarely been heard in the field. This issue argues that recasting the making of settler places in terms of their gendered production and experience not only enriches their own environmental history, but also broadens the historian’s enquiry to encompass the other lands implicated in the production of settler places.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 6, Issue 2, 2020 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: November 2020
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history.  It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal's goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 6, Issue 1, 2020 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: May 2020
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history.  It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal's goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 5, Issue 2, 2019 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: November 2019
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history.  It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal's goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 5, Issue 1, 2019 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: May 2019
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history.  It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal's goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 4, Issue 2, 2018 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: September 2018
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history.  It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal's goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 4, Issue 1, 2018 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: May 2018
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 3, Issue 2, 2017 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: October 2017
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 3, Issue 1, 2017 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: June 2017
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 2, 2016 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: September 2016
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.

International Review of Environmental History: Volume 1, 2015 »

Edited by: James Beattie
Publication date: August 2015
International Review of Environmental History takes an interdisciplinary and global approach to environmental history. It encourages scholars to think big and to tackle the challenges of writing environmental histories across different methodologies, nations, and time-scales. The journal embraces interdisciplinary, comparative and transnational methods, while still recognising the importance of locality in understanding these global processes. The journal’s goal is to be read across disciplines, not just within history. It publishes on all thematic and geographic topics of environmental history, but especially encourage articles with perspectives focused on or developed from the southern hemisphere and the ‘global south’.