Titles

Sung Tales from the Papua New Guinea Highlands

Studies in Form, Meaning, and Sociocultural Context

Edited by Alan Rumsey and Don Niles

ISBN 9781921862205 (Print version) $28.00 (GST inclusive)
ISBN 9781921862212 (Online)
Published August 2011

Citation url: http://press.anu.edu.au?p=145421


PDF file of full interview with Kenny Kendoli by Lila San Roque

Audio file of phrase of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, recorded by Kirsty Gillespie, 2005 (text 1)

Audio file of phrase of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, describing the full moon’s bright light, recorded by Kirsty Gillespie, 2005 (text 2)

Audio file of excerpt of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, recorded by Kirsty Gillespie, 2005 (text 1)

Audio file of excerpt of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, showing parallelism of musical elements, recorded by Kirsty Gillespie, 2005 (figure 1)

Audio file of excerpt of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, spoken text by Kenny Kendoli and Richard Alo (figure 2)

Audio file of excerpt of Duna pikono performance by Kiale Yokona, recorded by Kirsty Gillespie, 2005 (figure 2)

Audio file of the Huli bì té, Àe ndē ‘ah yes’ (texts 2 and 3)

Audio file of Huli bì té performed by Wandome, recorded by Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, 1975 (figure 7)

Audio file of Huli bì té performed by Bebalu, recorded by Jacqueline Pugh-Kitingan, 1975 (figure 11)

Audio file of excerpt of Enga tindi pii performance, recorded by Philip Gibbs, 2002

Audio file of lines 22–32 of Ipili tindi performance by Alua, recorded by Frances Ingemann, 1965

Audio file of lines 827–28 of Ipili tindi performance by Kaneanda, recorded by Frances Ingemann, 1965 (figures 3–4)

Audio file of line 24 of Ipili tindi performance by Yandapake, recorded by Frances Ingemann, 1964 (figure 5)

Audio file of line 68 of Ipili tindi performance by Kaneanda, recorded by Frances Ingemann, 1965 (figure 6)

Audio file of excerpt of Karinj enj performance by Josep Haip, recorded by Don Niles, 2006

Audio file of opening lines from the story of Rosa and Koka in Ku Waru tom yaya kange performance by Paulus Konts, recorded by Alan Rumsey, 1997 (text 1)

Video file of excerpt of Ku Waru tom yaya kange performance by Peter Kerua, recorded by Alan Rumsey, 1997

Audio file of opening amb kenan in Melpa kang rom performance by Paul Pepa, recorded by Radio Western Highlands, 1980 (figure 2).

Audio file of opening of Melpa kang rom section in performance by Paul Pepa, recorded by Radio Western Highlands, 1980 (figure 3)

Audio file of excerpt of Melpa kang rom performance by Paul Pepa at 05:47.1, recorded by Radio Western Highlands, 1980

Audio file of excerpt of Melpa kang rom performance by Paul Pepa at 06:37.5, recorded by Radio Western Highlands, 1980

Audio file of excerpt of Melpa kang rom performance by Paul Pepa at 13:12.3, recorded by Radio Western Highlands, 1980

Audio file of excerpt of Ku Waru tom yaya kange performance by Peter Kerua, recorded by Chris Haskett, 2006 (figure 5)

« »

The genres of sung tales that are the subject of this volume are one of the most striking aspects of the cultural scene in the Papua New Guinea Highlands. Composed and performed by specialist bards, they are a highly valued art form. From a comparative viewpoint they are remarkable both for their scale and complexity, and for the range of variation that is found among regional genres and individual styles. Though their existence has previously been noted by researchers working in the Highlands, and some recordings made of them, most of these genres have not been studied in detail until quite recently, mainly because of the challenging range of disciplinary expertise that is required—in anthropology, linguistics, and ethnomusicology.

This volume presents a set of interrelated studies by researchers in all of those fields, and by a Papua New Guinea Highlander who has assisted with the research based on his lifelong familiarity with one of the regional genres. The studies presented here (all of them previously unpublished and written especially for this volume) are of groundbreaking significance not only for specialists in Melanesia or the Pacific, but also for readers with a more general interest in comparative poetics, mythology, musicology, or verbal art.

Please read Conditions of Use before downloading the formats

Download Free Formats

Updated: 29 May 2012/ Responsible Officer: Director, SIS and University Librarian / Page Contact: ANU Press